Bone broth is a nutrient dense food that we recommend to all young families. If you’re wondering why check out this article HERE. Otherwise, roll up your sleeves, grab a ladle, and let’s get some bones a cookin’!

For many kids, chicken bone broth can be a tastier & more acceptable bone broth starter. We’re also giving you the low down on how to make beef bone broth too, but know that you can also make pig or fish bone broth as well.

As a general rule of thumb we’ll recommend that children have 2-3 cups of bone broth daily when healing from illness, injury, or surgery. When they’re generally well, or dealing with a chronic childhood illness, then we’ll have parents administer 1-2 cups daily.

The beauty of bone broth is that you can use it anywhere you would use water. So your kiddo could drink it straight up (if they like that sort of thing), you can use it as a base for soups or stews, you can boil rice in it, or can even add it to stir fry meals. Feel free to get creative with it!

 

Chicken-Bone-Broth-DSC_0259

 

Chicken Bone Broth from Scratch

Ingredients:

1 whole raw chicken OR 1 carcass of a cooked or roasted chicken OR 2 chicken backs

2-4 chicken feet (optional – cleaned & nails trimmed)

Chicken gizzards (optional – if using whole chicken)

1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar

Assortment of vegetables or vegetable scraps ( carrots, celery, onion, garlic, turnips, daikon radishes, ginger, etc.)

1 bunch of parsley

1 bunch of carrot tops/greens

Cold Filtered Water

Sea salt (as needed)

Instructions:

  1. Place chicken or chicken parts and bones in a large soup pot or crock pot (with optional chicken feet & gizzards). Add apple cider vinegar and plenty of water to fully cover the bones and chicken.
  2. Let sit covered for 30 minutes. (this step is key!)
  3. Add vegetables and/or vegetable scraps.
  4. Bring to a boil, skim off any froth on the surface of the water, cover and let simmer on low. Cook for 12-72 hours. If you like, you can use a potato smasher to smash the bones midway through. If the water drops below the level of the bones during cooking just simply add more water.
  5. When broth is almost done cooking, add parsley & carrot tops & let simmer for an additional 5-10 minutes (this will add more flavor & extra trace minerals).
  6. Shut off the heat, strain with a fine mesh strainer in a large glass bowl, and let cool for 1 hour before putting in the fridge.  Ladle into quart-sized mason jars & store in the fridge. Skim any fatty layer off the top after 24 hours (optional).
  7. You can store bone broth in glass mason jars in the fridge for up to 7 days. Afterwards, be sure to freeze any extra bone broth that you won’t use within 1 week of making.
  8. (Parent Tip: We’ll tend to freeze broth in BPA-free plastic containers since we’ve had too many glass jars break on us in the freezer, but feel free to stick with freezer-safe glass jars if you like!)

 

Beef_Bone_Broth4

Beef Bone Broth from Scratch

Ingredients:

4-5 lbs of meaty rib bones and/or marrow bones (from a butcher or farmer’s market)

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

Assortment of vegetables or vegetable scraps ( carrots, celery, onion, garlic, turnips, daikon radishes, ginger, etc.)

Cold Filtered Water

Sea salt (as needed)

Instructions:

  1. Roast bones on a baking sheet (with no oil) at 350 degrees for 45-60 minutes. (Note: this step can be stinky!)
  2. Put bones in a large cooking pot or crock pot. Add apple cider vinegar and enough water to fully cover the bones.
  3. Let soak for at least 1 hour. (This step is key!)
  4. Add vegetables or vegetable scraps.
  5. Bring to a boil, skim off any froth, cover and simmer on low. Cook for 12-72 hours. If the water level drops below the bones then just simply add more.
  6. Shut off the heat, strain with a fine mesh strainer in a large glass bowl, and let cool for 1 hour before putting in the fridge.  Ladle into quart-sized mason jars & store in the fridge. Skim any fatty layer off the top after 24 hours (optional).
  7. You can store bone broth in glass mason jars in the fridge for up to 7 days. Afterwards, be sure to freeze any extra bone broth that you won’t use within 1 week of making.

 

Bone broth blog graphic

A couple of notes:

1) We don’t generally salt our broth when making it here because we’ll add sea salt when cooking recipes with bone broth. But of course feel free to add salt if you like! (Just make sure it is high quality, pink Himalayan sea salt style like THIS ONE!)

2) Bone broth is medicinal! And that can be enhanced if you add herbs to the mix up. Feel free to add fresh rosemary if you’re sick with a head cold, or goji berries if you have poor vision, or astragalus if you need an immunity lift up.

Additional References

We’ve gone through LOTS of trial & error with bone broth making! If you want to explore more in the world of bone broth then check out some of our favorite books & people below:

Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook That Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition & The Diet Dictocrats – by Sally Fallon

Nourishing Broth: Nourishing Recipes for Bone Broths & Other Restorative Soups – by Sally Fallon-Morell

A Bowl Full of Broth: An Old Fashioned Remedy for the Modern World – by Ryland Peters & Small

Kitchen Witch Bone Broth (our dear friends in Santa Cruz, CA who are bringing real deal bone broth to the masses!)

So give it a go & let us know how everything goes in the comments below!